#SoaringToExcellence

Together with families, we help 4K-6th grade children build a firm foundation in faith, reading, writing, math, public speaking, social and life skills.

4K-6th Grade Curriculum

At Holy Angels Academy, we believe in teaching the whole child.  Our 4K teachers will incorporate the following six areas of child development into the fabric of each school day.

  • Faith Formation
  • Physical health, well-being and movement skills
  • Social and emotional development
  • Approaches to learning
  • Thinking abilities and general knowledge
  • Communication, language, and literacy

Our teachers are guided by the Creative Curriculum. The Creative Curriculum is a research based and proven educational program which supports active learning and promotes children’s progress in all areas of development. The Creative Curriculum believes that children learn best by doing, which is why it sets children up to learn through activities, play, and classroom interactions. Your child’s team of educators will establish a theme for each week. They will incorporate this theme into small group activities, large group activities, outdoor play, and the following 10 interest areas in the classroom.

  • Art
  • Building Blocks
  • Computers
  • Cooking
  • Dramatic Play
  • Library
  • Music and Movement
  • Sand and Water
  • Science and Discovery
  • Toys and Games

Each interest area is strategically set up to follow the week’s theme and learning objectives, as well as the interests of the class. This means that while your child is playing and interacting with friends, they are also learning!

At Holy Angels Academy, we believe in teaching the whole in a safe, nurturing, disciplined and inclusive environment based on the teachings of Jesus Christ.  Our teachers meet students where they are, help them set personal growth goals, differentiate instruction to meet their needs and recognize their perseverance and achievements through it all.  The following concepts are addressed in our 5K classroom:

Religion Goals 
God made us, loves us and wants us to love Him.
Sacraments show us God’s love and help us live that love in our own lives.
God made us and the world good so we should treat God, ourselves and others with respect and love.
The Bible is a sacred book that tells us about God and His love.
Develop familiarity with prayers, sacramentals and liturgical customs.
The Church is a family we belong to and we have a role to play in that family.

Reading and Grammar Goals
Understand and apply knowledge of print concepts, phonics, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, and fluency and comprehension as a foundation for developing reading skills.
Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding literature texts.
Actively in group reading activities with purpose and understanding of nonfiction texts.
Use words, phrases, and strategies acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to literature and nonfiction texts to build and apply vocabulary.

Writing Goals
Write for specific purposes and audiences.
Demonstrate command of English grammar and usage, focusing on noun, verbs, capitalization of first words and the pronoun I, end punctuation, and spelling simple words phonetically.

Speaking and Listening Goals
Listen actively and communicate effectively with at variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Media Literacy Goals
Recognize various types of media.
Recognize signs and logos and identify commercials or advertisements.

Math Goals
Construct patterns using classified shapes with 1, 2, or 3 attributes.
Illustrate the relationship between numbers 0-10 and quantities they represent.
Illustrate the relationship between numbers 11-20 and quantities they represent.
Model addition as putting together and adding to.
Model subtraction by taking apart and taking from.
Compare the values of pennies, nickels, and dimes.
Explain a measure of time to include months of the year, days of the week, and hours of the day to the hour on analog and digital clocks.
Compare length, height, temperature, capacity, and weight with non-standard units.
Interpret data using concrete graphs.

Social Studies Goals
Define self and family as a part of a community and church.
Identify how to be a good citizen and roles of authority in home, school, church, and community.
Classify roles of community helpers and the exchange of goods and services.
Explain the difference between wants and needs.
Identify people, events, traditions, and symbols of our country and church.
Recognize basic geographical locations, features, and direction on a map and globe.

Science Goals
Identify the parts and functions of the body.
Compare and contrast the four seasons.
Identify the needs of plants and animals.
Sort objects based on their properties of matter.
Identify the relationship between energy and forces.

At Holy Angels Academy, we believe in teaching the whole in a safe, nurturing, disciplined and inclusive environment based on the teachings of Jesus Christ.  Our teachers meet students where they are, help them set personal growth goals, differentiate instruction to meet their needs and recognize their perseverance and achievements through it all.  The goals for each subject represent a two year cycle of learning.  The following concepts are addressed in our 1st/2nd multi-age learning cycle:

Religion Goals
Show that God is a good Creator who wants to share heaven with us.
Emphasize that each human being is created in God’s image and called to eternal life with God through our union with Jesus.
Focus on the fact that the sacraments help us grow closer to God.
Emphasize the sacraments of Baptism, Penance/Reconciliation, and the Eucharist.
Imitate Christ as a model for human behavior by choosing good rather than evil.
Show that Jesus is the way to a free, happy life and that when we turn away from Him is sin, we can find our way back by showing sorrow and repenting.
Emphasize key points about the life of Jesus and depict them in context of God’s ongoing relationship with His people.
Focus on the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, highlighting the Gospels as the centerpiece of Scripture with special emphasis given to passages on forgiveness, reconciliation, and the Eucharist.
Foster a sense of sacred times, acts, words, places, items, and people.
Encourage an active prayer life to include understanding and in the liturgy.
Focus on the unity of the Church as a family unites to Christ and each other by Baptism, sharing the common goal of Heaven.
Focus on helping students understand and appreciate the Church as a place and community where we meet Christ and live out His calling, particularly through the sacraments.

Reading and Grammar Goals
Develop and understanding of the five components of reading (print concepts, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, and fluency and comprehension) to build foundational reading skills.
Read and comprehend a variety of literature withing a range of complexity appropriate for grades 1-3.  By the end of grade 2, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.
Read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 1-3.  By the end of grade 2, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.
Use words, phrases, and strategies acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to literature and nonfiction texts to build and apply vocabulary.

Writing Goal
Write routinely over brief time frames and for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to write in response to literature and nonfiction.

Speaking and Listening Goal
Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Media Literacy Goal
Recognize the role of media in informing, persuading, entertaining, and transmitting culture.

Math Goals
Model addition and subtraction problems within 20.
Illustrate that the digits of a four-digit number represent amounts of thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones.
Explain place value of digits to the thousands with the use of addition and subtraction.
Use a variety of strategies to calculate addition and subtraction facts up to 20.
Use a variety of strategies to calculate, represent, and solve addition and subtraction problems with regrouping.
Organize pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollar bills to display a variety of price values with a total value of one hundred cents or less.
Calculate the value of coins and bills to solve real world problems.
Describe plane and solid shapes and identify parts of shapes and their attributes.
Construct and deconstruct geometric shapes based on their attributes.
Use appropriate units and tools to measure and compare two objects or events according to one or more of the following attributes: length, height, weight, temperature, and volume.
Compare units of measurement using standard and non-standard forms such as length, width, and capacity.
Explain measure of time to include sequencing of days of week, months of year, and hours of day to hour and minute on analog and digital clocks.
Interpret graphs with data up to 4 categories using bar graphs, tally charts, picture graphs, and pictographs.
Produce graphs to represent data.
Represent partitions as equal parts of the whole–into halves, thirds, and fourths–with models and mathematical symbols.
Construct multiplication problems using arrays and repeated addition.

Social Studies Goals
Describe his/her family and culture.
Explain the rules, laws, and responsibilities as they relate to school, church, and community.
Identify important leaders, and their in our community, church, and country including their responsibilities.
Demonstrate people and events who have impacted the lives of the people of the United States.
Classify historical people and events including those of the Catholic faith by time order.
Identify characteristics of our national and Christian identity including symbols, holidays, and historical figures.
Describe ways he/she can honor and respect other people and America.
Compare how families live and work in various cultures.
Identify needs and wants and how they relate to spending, saving, and jobs in our family and community.
Explain how goods and services are provided and used.
Identify locations and land formations using map keys and cardinal directions.
Construct a map of a location using map symbols and compass rose.
Locate the seven continents and four oceans on a world map.

Science Goals
Identify the various characteristics and needs of animals and how their adaptations help them fulfill those needs to survive.
Identify the parts of a plant and their functions.
Identify the needs of plants and how their adaptations help them to fulfill those needs.
Compare and contrast a variety of animal habitats and how plants and animals in those habitats change over time.
Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.
Investigate the effects of different amounts of light and their effects on different materials.
Describe the patterns that can be predicted using patterns of our universe.
Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different types of materials based upon their observable properties.
Recognize different types of land-forms and bodies of water.
Represent how the Earth’s land-forms and bodies of water have changed and how they continue to change through natural phenomenon, such as weathering, erosion, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

At Holy Angels Academy, we believe in teaching the whole in a safe, nurturing, disciplined and inclusive environment based on the teachings of Jesus Christ.  Our teachers meet students where they are, help them set personal growth goals, differentiate instruction to meet their needs and recognize their perseverance and achievements through it all.  The goals for each subject represent a two year cycle of learning.  The following goals are addressed in our 3rd/4th multi-age learning cycle:

Religion Goals
Focus on the fact that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are active in the world, calling us to salvation.
Focus on the fact that the Triune God, as loving Creator, reveals Himself and acts in human history.
Emphasize all the sacraments as encounters with Christ with focus given to the discernment of God’s will in our lives, particularly with regard to the sacraments of Holy Orders and Matrimony.
Focus on healing and forgiveness, particularly the healing/forgiving effects exhibited in the sacraments of Baptism, Penance and Reconciliation, and Anointing of the Sick.
Highlight the life of love we are called to live as a fitting response to God’s love for us.
Focus on making concrete moral decisions and how each decision we make affects us.
Focus on key events and people within salvation history.
Develop Biblical literacy with an emphasis on reading and comprehending Scripture.
Foster the habits of personal and communal prayer as essential components of a healthy relationship with God.
Expose students to the richness and variety of prayer in the Church, highlighting both personal and communal forms of prayer.
Emphasize that we are all called to discipleship and that, as Church, we work together along our way as disciples of Christ.
Deepen the students’ understanding of their own place in the Church, emphasizing a sense of vocation, God’s calling for one’s life.

Reading and Grammar Goals
Apply foundational reading skills to build and demonstrate reading fluency and comprehension.
Read and comprehend a variety of literature within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 3-5.  By the end of grade 3, students interact with grade 2-3 texts proficiently and independently.  By the end of grade 4, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the middle of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.
Read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 3-5.  By the end of grade 3, students interact with grade 2-3 texts proficiently and independently.  By the end of grade 4, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the middle of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.
Build and use accurately conversational, general academic, and content-specific words and phrases.

Writing Goal
Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to write in response to literature and nonfiction texts; and, apply reading standards to support reflection and response to literature and nonfiction texts.

Speaking and Listening Goal
Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Media Literacy Goals
Recognize the role of the media in informing, persuading, entertaining, or transmitting culture.
Identify how information found in electronic, print, and mass media is used to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture.

Math Goals
Apply rounding strategies to make reasonable estimations for real world problems.
Apply place value concepts through millions to express numbers in standard, word, and expanded forms, compare and round whole numbers to a given place, and add and subtract multi-digit numbers.
Fluently calculate products and quotients for facts through 12s.
Solve real world problems using multiplication and division of whole numbers up to 3-digit by 1-digit numbers in equal group situations.
Multiply whole numbers up to 4-digit by 1-digit.
Multiply two 2-digit numbers.
Divide up to a 4-digit dividend by a 1-digit divisor with and without remainders.
Analyze simple fractions by comparing their size and equivalency.
Apply properties of fractions to compare fractions using benchmarks, common denominators, or equivalency.
Apply rules of fractions to add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers with like denominators and multiply a fraction by a whole number.
Apply the concepts of decimals to the hundredth to compare, add, subtract, and multiply decimals, and to convert fractions to decimals notation.
Solve real-world problems involving length.
Classify, with justification, 2 and 3 dimensional shapes by attributes, including size, shape, area, perimeter, lines, angles, and symmetry.
Apply area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real-world and mathematical problems.
Solve real-world problems involving mass and volume.
Interpret bar graphs, pictographs, line plots, and clocks to the nearest minute.
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving distances, elapsed time, liquid volume and masses, and represent data through use of line plots and graphs.

Social Studies Goals
Explain the importance of geography, using map skills, and availability of resources in meeting the needs of the citizens of South Carolina.
Describe the formation of the local and state government and our roles as citizens of the Catholic Church.
Summarize the contact, cooperation, and conflict between Native American tribes in South Carolina.
Outline the contact, cooperation, and conflict between Native American tribes in America.
Compare and contrast the contributions of various explorers to the culture of our nation and the Catholic Church.
Explain reasons, obstacles, and accomplishments of early settlements.
Describe the benefits and drawbacks of interactions between the Native Americans and settlers.
Compare and contrast reasons for settlement of the original 13 colonies.
Interpret maps in order to locate land-forms, states and capitals, natural resources, regions, and global features.
Give examples of religious influence, economic activities, and politics among the three colonial regions.
Explain the religious, political, and economic factors that led to the Revolutionary War.
Summarize the outcomes and influences of major battles and leaders of the American Revolution.
Explain the creation and structure of U.S. government, the rights and responsibilities of United States citizens, and the influence of religious institutions on the government and citizenship.
Describe the cause and effects of westward expansion of the U.S.
Describe the political, social, and economic causes, key battles, and effects of the American Civil War.
Explain the goals of Reconstruction, including, but not limited to, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, Freedmen’s Bureau, and sharecropping.

Science Goals
Plan a simple investigation using the scientific method, with teacher guidance.
Organize observable data to describe typical weather conditions, including weather related hazards, expected during a particular season.
Describe climates in different regions of the world.
Develop models to describe that organisms have diverse life cycles but all have common life features.
Analyze observable evidence that traits are inherited from parents and that environment can influence traits.
Construct an explanation based on evidence to explain how variations in characteristics contribute to an organisms’ survival.
Argue the effects of changing habitat on survival and of different responses organisms have to habitat change.
Analyze fossil data to provide evidence of the types of environments and habitats that existed in the past.
Build a simple circuit to demonstrate the flow of electricity.
Describe the transfer of sound waves as they travel through matter, including the human ear.
Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.
Investigate the sources of energy and the impact of energy uses on the environment.
Create simple and compound machines to demonstrate motion.

At Holy Angels Academy, we believe in teaching the whole in a safe, nurturing, disciplined and inclusive environment based on the teachings of Jesus Christ.  Our teachers meet students where they are, help them set personal growth goals, differentiate instruction to meet their needs and recognize their perseverance and achievements through it all.  The goals for each subject represent a two year cycle of learning.  The following concepts are addressed in our 5th/6th multi-age learning cycle:

Religion Goals
Focus on God’s plan for salvation by paying particularly close attention to the key roles that Jesus and Mary play in that plan.
Focus on the events detailed in the Old Testament and the fact that God is a loving God whose revelatory and salvific plan unfolds throughout history, beginning with Creation and heading towards eternity.
Focus on the central place that sacraments hold in Christian life with emphasis given to the different kinds of sacraments and their effects.
Focus on the fact that many of our sacramental celebrations are rooted in the Old Testament and that the revelation of Jesus brings Old Testament traditions and practices to fulfillment.
Probe the question of human freedom and the call to respond to God’s love with a life of goodness and holiness.
Connect the covenantal relationship with a loving God exhibited in Sacred Scripture with moral decision making.
Locate the sacramental life of the Church in Scripture, particularly in the Gospels.
Focus on the salvation history as conveyed in the Old Testament, emphasizing that the New Testament is prefigured in the Old Testament.
Connect a life of prayer with the call to holiness we are all given with an emphasis on listening to God’s voice in order to understand His call and will.
Equip students to practice different forms of prayer with an emphasis on Old Testament examples of prayer and spirituality.
Emphasize that the mission of the individual is bound up with the mission of the Church, particularly focusing on the 4 marks of the Church.
Focus on the Church as the fulfillment of the relationship between God and humanity seen in the history of Israel with an emphasis on the notion of the Church as God’s people in the New Covenant.

Reading and Grammar Goals
Apply foundational reading skills to demonstrate fluency and comprehension.
Read and comprehend a variety of literature within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 4-5.  By the end of grade 5, students interact with texts proficiently and independently.
Read a variety of literature within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 6-8.  By the end of grade 6, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 4-5.  By the end of grade 5, students interact with texts proficiently and independently.
Read a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 6-8.  By the end of grade 6, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Build and use accurately general academic and content-specific words and phrases.
Acquire and use accurately grade-level appropriate general academic and content-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Writing Goals
Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support reflection and response to literature and nonfiction texts.
Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support analysis, reflection, and research by drawing evidence from literature and nonfiction texts.

Speaking and Listening Goal
Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Media Literacy Goals
Identify how information found in electronic, print, and mass media is used to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture.
Critically analyze information found in electronic, print, and mass media used to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture.

Math Goals
Analyze place value, expanded form, and rounding of whole numbers and decimals from thousandths to billions.
Perform addition and subtraction operations with multi-digit whole numbers and decimals to thousandths including solving real-world problems.
Solve multiplication problems with multi-digit whole numbers and decimals from millions to thousandths using division with multi-digit divisors.
Apply addition and subtraction properties to solve problems with fractions and mixed numbers.
Apply multiplication and division properties to solve problems with fractions.
Evaluate algebraic and numerical expressions including the use of order of operations.
Apply operations of multi-digit decimals.
Solve multi-step real-world problems by converting units within a given measurement system (customary/metric).
Analyze geometric properties and relationships of 2D shapes to define and classify them in a hierarchy based on properties.
Apply principles to 3D shapes and find surface areas and volume of prisms.
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving perimeter, area, surface area, and volume.
Analyze ratios, rates, proportions, and percents.
Evaluate expressions with integers.
Evaluate numerical and algebraic expressions.
Solve one-variable equations and inequalities using dependent and independent variables.
Organize data and probability to create and interpret graphs, line plots, and coordinate planes.
Apply principles of data analysis to model and solve problems using various representations such as graphs, tables, and equations.

Social Studies Goals
Locate major countries and bodies of water in relation to their longitude, latitude, and general location on a globe or map.
Summarize how technologies (such as railroads, the steel plow, and barbed wire), federal policies (such as subsidies for the railroads and the Homestead Act), and access to natural resources affected the development of the West.
Summarize the social, political, and economic impact of the Industrial Revolution, immigration, and the rise of big businesses.
Analyze with scaffolding how American territorial and economic growth led to global competition and war (WWI) from the Industrial revolution to the 1920s.
Compare and contrast the economic, political, and social changes which took place between the 1920s and 1930s.
Summarize the major causes, principle events, key figures, developments in technology, and the social and political impacts of WWII on the American home front and the world.
Identify the conflicts of the Cold War between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the United States, including McCarthyism, the spread of communism, the Korean Conflict, Sputnik, the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Vietnam War.
Outline key figures, legislation, and societal changes of the Civil Rights Movement for post-Civil War Era to present.
Identify the political, social, economic, and environmental challenges faced by the United States and the Catholic Church during the period from the collapse of the Soviet Union to the presents.
Explain the origins and development of early civilizations.
Analyze the development of Egyptian and Hebrew cultures and their contributions to the modern world.
Analyze the impact of religion on India and China’s major developments and advancements.
Illustrate evidence of Greek civilization found in modern society.
Analyze the political, economic, and social advancements of Roman civilization and its impact on the modern world.
Compare and contrast regions affected by Islamic and African civilizations.
Differentiate the advancements of Mesoamerican cultures.
Relate the political, economic, social, and religious events of the Middle Ages.
Analyze the factors that contributed to the beginning of the Renaissance.

Science Goals
Plan a simple investigation using the scientific method, with limited teacher guidance.
Classify living and nonliving factors.
Identify the parts and functions of the human body systems.
Describe vascular and non-vascular plants and their processes.
Differentiate among the various biomes and understand the impact of the human footprint on Earth’s resources and environment.
Classify rocks and minerals by various properties and how they are formed.
Create a model to explain the relationship among the Earth, the Sun, and the Moon.
Compare and contrast the movement, patterns, and physical characteristics of objects in space over time.
Construct an evidence based explanation from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize Earth’s history.
Analyze and interpret geological data of past and current plate motions.
Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Develop a model of characteristics of ocean water, ocean life, and ocean zones in relation to Earth’s cycles.
Compare and contrast the composition and characteristics of different layers of the atmosphere.
Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex reactions of air masses result and change weather conditions.
Create a model to explain how rotation of the Earth and unequal heating cause changes that determine regional climates.
Construct an evidence based argument for the explanation in the role of Earth’s energy resources.